Random Thought for Tuesday, January 7, 2014

I would rather have to course-correct on a wrong choice made with strong conviction than to be adrift in a spineless ocean of indecisiveness.

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Random Thought for Friday, September 27, 2013

In the spirit of full disclosure– Although I’m a fan of Apple, and am both personally and professionally an owner, user and consumer of Apple’s products, I am not— as of this writing, at least— an iPhone user. 

Since the release of iOS 7, I’ve listened to the reactions on radio and tv, and read opinions both on-and off-line. Although the speed and rate of adoption has been high (as is with any new technology), the reactions so far have been, in my less-than-scientific survey, overwhelmingly less than positive, ranging from a “wait and see” to indifference to downright disgust.

This got me thinking– Does iOS 7 have the potential of becoming Apple’s Vista?

Just thinking out loud here…

New Yahoo! logo– thoughts

So, I opened up my browser and this is what I found…

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The new Yahoo! logo.

Now, I’m pretty sure this has been covered elsewhere, so I’m just going to give my initial thoughts.

Looks like they “hipster-ized” this logo.

Here’s the old logo for reference (no that it was better, but at least it was quirky and had personality).

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Yahoo!? More like “yikes!” to me.

Update:  Shortly after I wrote this, and while going through my feeds, I came across this post from Yahoo!’s Tumblr. The short version? They’re doing a “variation on a theme” logo a day, until they unveil the new logo on Sept. 4th. Guess we’ll have to wait and see what else they have to show until the big reveal next month. Stay tuned.
Oh, and here’s a link to their post. It has a short video explaining the whole thing, although I’m still not clear as to why they’re going through this exercise…

 

Sharing is caring– about who you’re sharing with

Three can keep a secret, if two of them are dead
— Benjamin Franklin

This morning, I was asked about some files that I had been asked to placed in Dropbox. I knew I had sent them already, so I told the person to look in her folder (we have shared folders set up to make it easier to “sneaker-net” either large files or multiple files more easily. She did, and replied “they’re not there. There’s nothing there”.

What the–?!

I went into my folder. Maybe, for some strange, unforeseen reason I had put them there instead (I knew I hadn’t, but figured I’d check anyway).

Nothing there, either.

Panic. How could–? When–? Who could–? Then I remembered seeing pop-up notices that files had been deleted yesterday. I just chalked it up to her removing the files I had sent and storing them locally. How did they just disappear? Did someone delete them? And why?

I was ticked off. And determined to figure out how this happened and who perpetrated such a thing.

I went online and logged in to Dropbox. Surely there had to be a way to see who had accessed the folders recently. If there wasn’t, an immediate password change would ensue. Either I was getting to the bottom of this, or I was locking things up. Fast.

I looked in the Dropbox menu for the shared folders and realized a couple of things. First, neither I or my coworker was the owner of our respective shared folder (never realized I wasn’t the folder creator, since it had my name on it). Second, one of the folders had an additional person set up to have access.

Turns out the owner/creator of the folders– according to the trail provided by Dropbox– had gone and deleted the contents of the folders. Now, I understand that, as a folder admin, the contents were counting against their storage space, and maybe they needed it for some purpose. That’s fine. My issue was in not being told they were deleting the contents.

Thankfully, Dropbox allows you to recover deleted files within 30 days (I didn’t know how initially, but Dropbox has a nice FAQ– win!) , so I was able to restore everything. In the process, I created new share folders, and I assigned limited user access.

My takeaway? An obvious one, but one I had not had the presence of mind to remember in this context– always be aware of who you’re sharing content with. And, from time to time, it’s not a bad idea to review who has access to what. Especially when it comes to online content, whether you generate it in the form of Facebook status updates, tweets, blog posts and comments, or files stored online.

Short roundup of packaging that’s caught my eye

Note: I’m using the mobile app for the first time so my apologies if anything looks wonky…

A few wine labels that caught my eye recently…

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This olive oil bottle is a nice change of pace from the traditional earth tones typically found on olive oil labels and bottles.

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I noticed the other day that Ginseng Up had redesigned their labels. I remember buying Ginseng Up a lot in high school
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Brooklyn Nets logo: Can I do better than Jay-Z?

So, the internets is all up in arms with the (now) Brooklyn Nets and the newly-unveiled (previously leaked via Twitter) logo. I like the concept as a whole, although I have my issues with it.

So, I decided that, over lunch today, I would take a stab at tweaking the things I felt were a bit weak, especially with how the type was addressed. It’s far from perfect and still needs some polishing (making the geometric elements nice and symmetrical, etc.– remember, this was cobbled together over lunch today), but overall I’m satisfied with the result of a half hour’s worth of effort.

Anyone else have any thoughts?Image

Boiling things down

I know this is awfully simplistic, but, having been immersed in Photoshop most of the day for the last few days, making digital renders and retouches, the following occurred to me:

If I had to boil down Photoshop to 3 things, it would be:

  • Layers
  • Masks
  • Blending modes

Everything else (and that’s a lot of everything else) builds on, is an offshoot, or refines these elements.

What do you think? Would you dissect it differently?

Shortcuts CAN be a good thing

I’ve been doing quite a bit of photo retouching this past week, and in the process realized that I wasn’t being as efficient in my workflow as i could. I decided to consciously seek out the single-keystroke shortcuts for those tools that I was using the most. Here they are, in no particular order:

  • J= healing brush
  • B= paint brush
  • V= move (the crosshair arrows at the very top of the tools palette)
  • L= lasso
  • M= marquee
  • G= gradient
  • P= paths

Now, I realize that these are pretty basic, and that there are many more single-key shortcuts (and we’re not even getting into multi-key shortcuts, like image or canvas sizing), but I’m willing to bet that a lot of us out there suffer from this same condition of convenience, and just move the mouse/pen over to the specific tool on the palette, thinking that in the short run that one step really makes no discernible difference. Whether it does or not is another matter, and entirely up to you to decide.

I, for one, plan on continuing to use these and try to make my workflow a tiny bit more efficient.